About

WHO WE ARE:

Fisheries for Communities is a network of Indigenous and non-Indigenous fish harvesters, small businesses, fishmongers, chefs, restaurateurs, fishing families, community organizations, and citizens who have grown tired and frustrated watching the many social, cultural, and economic benefits of our fisheries increasingly flowing to outside investors and large scale global corporations at the cost of local fishing families and communities. As this trend continues, we are also losing our capacity for local management and stewardship of our marine environment and our long-standing connections to the sea.

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WHY DOES THIS MATTER?

BC wild fisheries provide a bounty of values to coastal communities and Canadians. Our Pacific fisheries are a critical source of local healthy food, a key contributor to our economy, a provider of jobs, a connector to nature, and for the many communities along our BC coast, a foundation of our identity itself.

Our deeply rooted connection to the sea, and all the varied values we gain from it, are being increasingly put at risk. We must ensure British Columbian wild fisheries are managed for the benefit of all Canadians from fish harvester to seafood lover – from our waters to our dinner table.

WHAT CAN BE DONE?

Fisheries management in BC is not meeting the needs of our fish harvesters, and increasingly creating a desperate situation in rural coastal communities. We continue to invest hundreds of millions annually in protecting and stewarding our precious resource, but for whom?

We have many healthy and active fisheries and hundreds of millions of dollars in seafood are harvested from our waters each year, but in whose pockets does this end up? Increasingly the vast social, cultural, and economic benefits from this resource are being lost to our communities and fish harvesters with devastating consequences.

What can be done about it? Is it even possible to recapture the many benefits of BC fisheries for current and future BC generations?

There is an opportunity for Policy Reform right now!

The Canadian Government and the Minister of Fisheries and Oceans is currently reviewing the 20 recommendations from the House of Commons Standing Committee on Fisheries and Oceans, which addresses BC fisheries licensing policy and how that affects who receives the benefits. (READ THE FULL REPORT HERE)

This is our chance to tell Ottawa that we need a system that works for hard-working BC fish harvesters and their communities, rather than line the pockets of speculative investors who’ve never been on the deck of a boat, and do not contribute back to our communities!

IMG_3287_Joe Martin fishing

Who is standing with our Coastal Community

RESOURCES

Want to dive deeper into the issue? Read our ever-growing library of reports and papers that tackle different facets of this complex problem.

Go To Resources

WHO WE ARE:

Save our Coastal Community is a network of indigenous and non-indigenous, active fish & shell-fish harvesters small businesses, fishmongers, chefs, restaurateurs, fishing families and citizens who have grown tired and frustrated with the continued destruction of our shared resource, coastal communities that are becoming ghost towns and the corporatization and wall street style selling of valuable quotas.

WHY DOES THIS MATTER?

BC wild fisheries provide a bounty of values to coastal communities and Canadians. Our Pacific fisheries are a critical source of local healthy food, a key contributor to our economy, a provider of jobs, a connector to nature, and for the many communities along our BC coast, a foundation of our identity itself.

Our deeply rooted connection to the sea, and all the varied values we gain from it, are being increasingly put at risk. We must ensure British Columbian wild fisheries are managed for the benefit of all Canadians from fish harvester to seafood lover – from our waters to our dinner table.

SOCC_About_Us_Fishing_2
IMG_8389

WHAT CAN BE DONE?

Fisheries management in BC is not meeting the needs of our fish harvesters, and increasingly creating a desperate situation in rural coastal communities. We continue to invest hundreds of millions annually in protecting and stewarding our precious resource, but for whom?

We have many healthy and active fisheries and hundreds of millions of dollars in seafood are harvested from our waters each year, but in whose pockets does this end up? Increasingly the vast social, cultural, and economic benefits from this resource are being lost to our communities and fish harvesters with devastating consequences.

What can be done about it? Is it even possible to recapture the many benefits of BC fisheries for current and future BC generations?

There is an opportunity for Policy Reform right now!

The Canadian Government and the Minister of Fisheries and Oceans is currently reviewing the 20 recommendations from the House of Commons Standing Committee on Fisheries and Oceans, which addresses BC fisheries licensing policy and how that affects who receives the benefits. (READ THE FULL REPORT HERE)

This is our chance to tell Ottawa that we need a system that works for hard-working BC fish harvesters and their communities, rather than line the pockets of speculative investors who’ve never been on the deck of a boat, and do not contribute back to our communities!

ChelseyEllisPhotography6
IMG_3287_Joe Martin fishing

Who is standing with our Coastal Community

RESOURCES

Want to dive deeper into the issue? Read our ever-growing library of reports and papers that tackle different facets of this complex problem.

Go To Resources